By David Liu - foodconsumer.org, Jan 23, 2007 - 12:28:17 PM

Eating too much of heme iron and or red meat may increase the risk of coronary heart disease in women with diabetes, according to a new study by Harvard researchers.

Those who consumed the highest amounts of heme iron were 50 percent more likely to have coronary heart disease (CHD) compared to those consumed the lowest, Lu Qi, MD, PHD from the Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health and colleagues reported.

From the study, Lu Qi and team wanted to know how long-term consumption of red meat and dietary iron would affect coronary heart disease risk in diabetes.   Prior evidence indicates that diabetes-related metabolic abnormality may worsen the adverse effects of iron overload on cardiovascular health.

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